Salon: "Either to please or to educate." Open your mind and your vision, please make your way in the 17th Century.
centuriespast:

RUBENS, Peter PaulThe Martyrdom of St Livinus1633Oil on canvas, 455 x 347 cmMusées Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels

centuriespast:

RUBENS, Peter Paul
The Martyrdom of St Livinus
1633
Oil on canvas, 455 x 347 cm
Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels

(via cabinet-de-curiosites)

tierradentro:

“Euclid" (detail), c.1635, Jusepe de Ribera.

tierradentro:

Euclid" (detail), c.1635, Jusepe de Ribera.

(via jaded-mandarin)

uno-sole-minor:

TODAY
On the 1st of september 1715, died the Sun King.

"After a week of slow agony, Louis XIV passed away in Versailles on 1 September 1715 at 8.15 in the morning, just before his 77th birthday. A reign of 72 years ended, the longest in the history of France. Another reign almost as long began: that of Louis XV (1715-1774).

Worthy of a tragedy of Racine, the death of Louis XIV began on 10 August 1715. On his return from hunting in Marly, the king felt a sharp pain in his leg. His doctor Fagon diagnosed sciatica and never budged from this position. But black spots soon began to appear: the sign of senile gangrene. Despite the atrocious pain, the king continued with his usual occupations without flinching. He intended to carry out his functions until the end. The old oak seemed ineradicable and won the admiration of all. But on 25 August, his feast day, he had to take to his bed. He was not to leave his bedchamber.

The gangrene then affected his bones the next day. The doctors felt helpless. The king received on the same day his great-grandson, aged 5, the future Louis XV, to give him advice. He recommended him to relieve his people’s suffering and avoid war as far as possible: “it is the ruin of peoples!” Aware of having failed on this point, he asked him to remain a “peace-loving prince”
.
But his death took longer than expected. The king made his adieux to Mme de Maintenon three times and twice to the Court. A Provençal named Brun was allowed to approach the royal bed on 29 August: he claimed to have a miraculous cure. In fact, the king did feel better. But the disease was still there and making progress. Louis XIV finally went into a semi-coma lasting the next two days. He died on 1 September in the morning. His body was on view for eight days in the Mercury salon. He was transported to Saint-Denis on 9 September.

The Duc d’Orléans, nephew of Louis XIV, became Regent of the kingdom until the majority of the future Louis XV. The family quarrels began: on 2 September, the Regent persuaded the Parliament of Paris to annul the testament of the king which confiscated some of the assembly’s prerogatives. He governed from his residence in the Palais-Royal and installed the future king in the Tuileries palace on 9 September. The Court left Versailles. Philippe V of Spain, however, had not totally abandoned his claims to the throne of France in spite of the Treaty of Ryswick in 1713. A new war was on the way and with it a new combination of alliances in Europe…”

(Source: en.chateauversailles.fr, via delphes)

design-is-fine:

Rapier, 1604. A wedding gift among brothers. Steel, gold, Bohemian diamonds, pearl embroidery. Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 📷 Jürgen Karpinski. 

The splendour of these weapons befitted their use in court festivities and ceremonial and their status as diplomatic gifts. The knight‘s sword, modified in the form of a rapier or dress sword, had become a prestigious fashion accessory in keeping with the increasingly luxurious clothing that was worn.

Exhibition Precious Ceremonial Weapons from the Rüstkammer of August the Strong, until Oct 04, 2014, Dresden.

(via thekinkycardinal)

jaded-mandarin:

Portrait of a Lady, Called Elizabeth, Lady Tanfield, 1615. Detail.

jaded-mandarin:

Portrait of a Lady, Called Elizabeth, Lady Tanfield, 1615. Detail.

centuriespast:

RUBENS, Peter PaulThe Martyrdom of St Livinus1633Oil on canvas, 455 x 347 cmMusées Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels

centuriespast:

RUBENS, Peter Paul
The Martyrdom of St Livinus
1633
Oil on canvas, 455 x 347 cm
Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts, Brussels

(via baroqueart)

jeannepompadour:

Costume design for male dancer Henri de Gissey, c. mid 17th century

jeannepompadour:

Costume design for male dancer Henri de Gissey, c. mid 17th century

(via louis-etoile)

slojnotak:

Peter Paul Rubens  - Daniel in the Lions’ Den (1613-15)

slojnotak:

Peter Paul Rubens  - Daniel in the Lions’ Den (1613-15)

(via what-a-lovely-shroud)

art-of-swords:

Engraved and Gilt Partisan

  • Dating: late 17th century
  • Culture: European
  • Measurements: height 190.5 cm

The weapon has an iron head with a large, straight-edged cusp-blade, ribbed at the centre, with wings, tapering socket provided with rings at both edges, while the upper one is smooth with three rings.

The surface of the lower half of the blade blade, from its half to the socket, is decorated with engravings and remains of gilding; featuring symmetric effigies of flowers, grotesque masks and spirals, on dotted ground.

The wings are shaped and engraved as exotic birds and snakes, the socket decorated with floral bands. Antique, wooden haft of circular section, comes with longitudinal, fluted decorations alternated to rows of brass studs.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

(via unionthesalmon)

greuze:

Circle of Annibale Carracci, The Head of Christ (Detail), 16th/17th Century

greuze:

Circle of Annibale Carracci, The Head of Christ (Detail), 16th/17th Century

(via what-a-lovely-shroud)

icibrennus:

Philippe de la Tour du Pin de La Charce, better known under the name Phylis de la Charce, was born in 1645 on Montmorin as a fifth child of Françoise and Pierre de la Tour Gouvernet, protestant family of Barons from Dauphiné province. Her life was marked by two major events. From 1672 to 1674 she lived in Nyons, where she got name Phillis (instead of Philippe) according to main character from a book French writer Honore d’Urfe.
In 1692, 6 years after his conversion to Catholicism after the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes and during War of the League of Augsburg, Dauphiné province was invaded by the army of the Duke of Savoy. According to legend, she organized resistance against the invaders and heading an army of peasants she freed the Dauphine region. On the role that could play the Philis de la Charce, historians had debated for more than a century. According to some of them, she headed only band of looters who often came here “to collect contributions from citizens of local towns and villages.”
Thanks to her relations with nobilities in French Royal Court and in Paris she was even rewarded with pension from King Louis XIV. In 19th century she was even remembered as “Jeanne d’Arc du Dauphiné (Joan of Arc of Dauphiné province”.

(via louis-etoile)

didoofcarthage:

Minerva by Rembrandt van Rijn 
c. 1631
oil on oak panel
Gemäldegalerie

didoofcarthage:

Minerva by Rembrandt van Rijn 

c. 1631

oil on oak panel

Gemäldegalerie

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org, via what-a-lovely-shroud)


Portrait of a Woman (detail), Rembrandt, 1639

Portrait of a Woman (detail), Rembrandt, 1639

(Source: sforzinda, via ascaniosforzas)

historical-nonfiction:

Louis XIV pf France (the Sun King) wanted to make France the arbiter of everything luxury — and make his country rich selling it. And one of the most important luxuries was fashion. To show off the newest French styles, Louis XIV’s designers created bisque dolls, or fashion dolls. They were small, easy to travel, and wore only the finest and most trendy clothes. Bisque dolls remained important, and designers used little dolls instead of females as models through World War 2.

historical-nonfiction:

Louis XIV pf France (the Sun King) wanted to make France the arbiter of everything luxury — and make his country rich selling it. And one of the most important luxuries was fashion. To show off the newest French styles, Louis XIV’s designers created bisque dolls, or fashion dolls. They were small, easy to travel, and wore only the finest and most trendy clothes. Bisque dolls remained important, and designers used little dolls instead of females as models through World War 2.

(via frenchhistory)